Tag Archives: jogjakarta

Jogja sweet Jogja

My Jogja sisters and I

My Jogja sisters and I. I miss these ladies alot

About a month ago Isan and I made a fleeting visit to Jogjakarta, Java for the weekend. Life had been getting us down in Bali and we needed some familiar surroundings. It was Jogja where Isan and I met, back in 2011 whilst I was studying through the ACICIS (Australian Consortium for ‘In-Country’ Indonesian Studies) Program. We didn’t meet at University but through a series of friendship channels. These friendships are what made Jogja special for us, as these people weren’t just our mates but our family.

We are Family

We are Family

Since living in Bali for the past 10 months we have not been able to create a support network like the one above. For me personally I have not been able to find people that I can connect with like this. Friends that treat me, as they do Isan. My Jogja friends don’t care whether I am black, brown, green or white, they just care that I am good to them and they are good to me. Simple friendships= simple happiness.

I lived in Jogja for a year, whilst Isan was there for a good part of 9 months. So there were a lot of people to see, favourite places to visit and loved warungs (local eatieries) to eat at. We were so busy that I didnt get the chance to take as much photos as I would have liked. We were also very fortunate that Isans Mum and younger sister had plans to spend the weekend in Jogja with us. Isans Mum is a wonderful, strong lady who leaves me in awe every time we catch up. This visit we spent a lot of time alone together and we got a proper chance to get to know each other better. I forgot to take some photos though…sad face. I did however play quirky photographer with Isans sister. See photo below, looks like Meity has flew from the sky, Dragonball style.

Isans younger sister, Meity....aka Dragonball meity.

Isans younger sister, Meity….aka Dragonball Meity.

We did however make the time to fit in a little scenic tour followed by a seafood feast at Depok Beach. The beaches near Jogja do not compare to those of Bali, but the prices and variety of the seafood available is more enticing. It seems the beaches still have lots of bounty and the prices are all set at a local value. We were able to enjoy crab, prawns, fish, mussels, squid and a large coconut each to wash it all down with. I was so excited that I couldn’t wait to dig in and that is why the photo below only shows the aftermath.

It was a delicious seafood feast

It was a delicious seafood feast

After we had gorged ourselves, I took a stroll down the beach whilst Isan had a nap.

I'm beached as bro....at Pantai Depok

I’m beached as bro….at Pantai Depok

When it came to the end of little getaway, we didnt want to leave. Jogja is very special to us and eventually one day we hope to make it our home.

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How to eat like an Indonesian

The best way to enjoy Indonesian food: with family and friends, especially on Jalan Malioboro, Jogjakarta (btw sorry for showing my feet- more on that in a later post)

The best way to enjoy Indonesian food: with family and friends, especially on Jalan Malioboro, Jogjakarta (btw sorry for showing my feet- more on that in a later post)

There is a saying in Indonesia that if you haven’t eaten rice throughout the day, then you haven’t eaten at all. Rice is the bread and butter of every Indonesians diet and this is the main reason I titled my blog ‘don’t forget the rice’. Almost every meal will be served with rice, even for breakfast and sometimes even for dessert.

There are 4 different words in Indonesian for rice but the one your probably most familiar with is Nasi. This translates into English as cooked rice. The main rice that is available on every menu is of the white variety. I mean you can even order it nicely wrapped up like a burger at McDonald’s.

How you eat your rice is up to you. Indonesians eat their meals with a spoon and a fork or with their right hand. There are lots of variables as to when it is appropriate to use either, but as a foreigner I suggest you stick with the spoon and fork method to begin with. From an outsider it might look easy eating sans utensils but it takes a lot of practice to make it look effortless and dignified.

Eating with your hand is surprisingly satisfying, especially when you have had a long day.

Eating with your hand is surprisingly satisfying, especially when you have had a long day. (p.s. First GIF I ever made…)

When eating your….say, nasi goreng (fried rice) the fork is in your left hand as you would normally and the spoon in your right as your main utensil. The spoon will play the role of knife and spoon, very versatile little fellow and he has probably played knifey-spoony before.

And if you want to impress/flatter your host and/or your Indonesian friends, once you have finished your meal place your fork and spoon as shown in the picture below.

.....................Selamat makan

…………………Selamat makan

Memories of holidays past is always about the food for me. What are your favourite Indonesian food memories? Have you ever tried Durian? I have and I didn’t like it, but Isan doesnt like vegemite so we are even.